Consequences Of Attacking Iran And Why Tehran Is Not Worried

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Postby Armenian on Sat Aug 18, 2007 3:24 am

I think their desperation is making them loose it over there in Washington DC. Next, they will be designating Iran, the nation, a terrorist organization. Do these people even realize how stupid they are acting? These Neocons have become the dark clowns of the world. Had they been not so dangerous they would actually be very entertaining, even funny.

Armenian

************************************************** **********

[b]Terrorist Label for Iran Guard Reflects U.S. Impatience With U.N.[/b[

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In moving toward designating Iran’s Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps as a foreign terrorist organization, the Bush administration is adopting a more confrontational approach with Tehran, reflecting frustration with a stalled sanctions package at the United Nations Security Council, officials said Wednesday. White House and State Department officials were debating when to make the formal designation — White House officials want to do so now, and the State Department wants to wait until various August recesses are over — but the administration was already adopting tougher talk toward Tehran.

“We are confronting Iranian behavior across a variety of different fronts, on a number of different, quote unquote, battlefields, if you will,” the State Department spokesman, Sean McCormack, told reporters in Washington. His use of the word “battlefields” was described by some European diplomats as another ratcheting up of the anti-Iran statements. Mr. McCormack maintained that his use of the word did not mean that the State Department had adopted the view that the United States should confront Iran militarily, a view that has been advocated by some officials in Vice President xxxx Cheney’s office.

“I was trying to illustrate that you don’t just confront Iran with guns and soldiers; sometimes you do it with lawyers and accountants and diplomats,” Mr. McCormack said. But other administration officials said that the United States was getting increasingly frustrated that Security Council sanctions, which were meant to rein in Tehran’s nuclear ambitions, have been anemic. Beyond that, administration officials are worried that America’s allies in imposing the sanctions — particularly Russia and China — have been slow to agree to increase the pressure and have balked at imposing tougher measures.

In Tehran, politicians across the board said Wednesday that if the United States proceeded with plans to declare the Revolutionary Guard a foreign terrorist organization, the action would only unify politicians in Iran and lead to an escalation of hostility between the countries. Iranian government officials were not available to comment on the issue. But the Fars News Agency, which is close to the Revolutionary Guard, quoted an official at the Foreign Ministry as dismissing the news as propaganda. Analysts and former government officials in Tehran, both conservative and reformist, said the planned designation of the Guard as a terrorist organization was intended to destabilize the government.

“Maybe the Revolutionary Guards have done certain things in their own backyard,” said Saeed Leylaz, an economist and a reformist political analyst, referring to Afghanistan and Iraq. “But they have also cooperated with Americans there.”

“Now the United States is asking Iran to help stabilize Iraq, but in the meantime suggests that after stability in Iraq it will come after Iran,” added Mr. Leylaz, who often criticizes President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad. Iran and the United States have held three rounds of talks on an ambassadorial level in Baghdad in recent months to discuss how to stabilize Iraq. The talks were held as United States officials accused Iran of stepping up support for radical Shiite militia groups in Iraq. Iran has brushed off the accusations and has said its efforts are aimed at stabilizing a democratic government in Iraq.

“The Americans want to cover up their own failure in Iraq with these kinds of accusations,” said Akbar Alami, a reformist member of Parliament. A former deputy defense minister, Alireza Akbari, warned that the measure could cause instability in the region. “If they put pressure on the security apparatus of a country, they should expect a similar reaction,” he said. “And it would certainly serve the real terrorists in the region if the United States and Iran move toward confronting one another.”

Source: http://www.nytimes.com/2007/08/16/wo...ref=middleeast
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Postby Armenian on Sat Aug 18, 2007 3:26 am

Russia, China, Iran issue veiled warning to U.S. to stay away from Central Asia

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BISHKEK, Kyrgyzstan: The leaders of Russia, China and Iran have warned the outside world to leave Central Asia alone to look after its own stability and security, in a veiled message to the United States issued on the eve of major war games between Russia and China. Leaders issued a statement Thursday, at a meeting of the Shanghai Cooperation Organization, that was an apparent warning to the United States to stay away from the strategically placed, resource-rich region.

"Stability and security in Central Asia are best ensured primarily through efforts taken by the nations of the region on the basis of the existing regional associations," the leaders said at the end of the organization's summit in the Kyrgyz capital, Bishkek. Presidents Vladimir Putin of Russia, Hu Jintao of China and leaders of four ex-Soviet Central Asian nations that are part of the SCO were all also set to attend Friday's military exercises in the Chelyabinsk region in Russia's Ural Mountains. Some 6,000 Russian and Chinese troops, dozens of aircraft and hundreds of armored vehicles and other heavy weapons will be participating the games — the first such joint drills on Russia's territory.

Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, an observer at the summit, criticized U.S. missile defense plans as a threat to the entire region. "These intentions go beyond just one country. They are of concern for much of the continent, Asia and SCO members," he said. The SCO was created 11 years ago to address religious extremism and border security issues in Central Asia. In recent years, with Iran, India, Pakistan and Mongolia signing on as observers, the group has increasingly grown into a bloc aimed at defying U.S. interests in the region, which has huge hydrocarbon reserves. Ahmadinejad is attending the annual summit for the second consecutive year. In 2005, the SCO called for a timetable to be set for the withdrawal of U.S. troops from two member countries, Uzbekistan and Kyrgyzstan. Uzbekistan evicted U.S. forces later that year, but Kyrgyzstan still hosts a U.S. base, which supports operations in nearby Afghanistan.

Russia also maintains a military base in Kyrgyzstan.

Putin didn't mention the United States in his speech at the summit, but he said that "any attempts to solve global and regional problems unilaterally are hopeless." He also called for "strengthening a multi-polar international system that would ensure equal security and opportunities for all countries" — comments echoing Russia's frequent complaints that the United States dominates world affairs. Moscow has also bristled at Washington's plans to deploy missile interceptors in Poland and a radar in the Czech Republic, saying the system would threaten Russia security. The United States says the missile defenses are necessary to avert the threat of possible missile attacks by Iran.

Hu also said signaled that security for Central Asia was best left to the nations themselves. "The SCO nations have a clear understanding of the threats faced by the region and thus must ensure their security themselves," he said. Moscow and Beijing have developed what they dubbed a "strategic partnership" after the Soviet collapse, cemented by their perceptions that the United States dominates global affairs. China hosted the first-ever joint maneuvers in August 2005, which included a mock assault on the beaches of northern China and featured Russia's long-range bombers. The SCO, whose members are some of the world's biggest energy producers and consumers, also discussed ways to enhance energy cooperation. The U.S. has supported plans for new pipelines that would carry the region's oil and gas to the West and bypass Russia, while Moscow has pushed strongly to control the export flows.

China also has shown a growing appetite for energy to power its booming economy. A further sign of the group's intention to influence energy markets was the participation in the Bishkek summit of Turkmen President Gurbanguli Berdymukhamedov, whose country is the second-largest producer of natural gas in the former Soviet Union after Russia. Turkmenistan is not a SCO member; the president was attending as a guest.

Source: http://www.iht.com/articles/ap/2007/...ity-Summit.php
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Postby Armenian on Sat Aug 18, 2007 3:27 am

Russia says Iran poses no threat

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(Russian foreign minister Sergei Lavrov)

Russia sees no threat emanating from Iran, the "rogue state" the United States is building its missile shield in Europe against, the Russian foreign minister said Thursday. The U.S. announced in January plans to place a radar and a host of interceptor missiles in Poland and the Czech Republic to fend off what Washington sees as a growing missile threat from "rogue states," including Iran. "In analyzing the Iranian leader's statement and the quite precise information at our disposal, we can see no such long-term threat," Sergei Lavrov told the media on the sidelines of a summit of the Shanghai Cooperation Organization (SCO) underway in the Kyrgyz capital, Bishkek. Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad said earlier Thursday that the deployment of a U.S. missile shield in Europe threatened not only Iran but also the whole of Eurasia. Asked when Russian and U.S. experts would hold a second round of consultations on the proposed U.S. missile shield, the minister said: "In September." Lavrov also said that although Russia and China had not yet considered cooperation in missile defense, the two countries "share a vision of how to provide security." "We and China are analyzing the U.S. global missile defense plans targeting Europe and the East," the diplomat said. The SCO, a regional group largely seen as a counterweight to U.S. influence in Asia, comprises Russia, China, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan and Uzbekistan, and has Iran, India, Pakistan and Mongolia as observers.

Source: http://en.rian.ru/russia/20070816/71949222.html
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Postby Immortal Persian on Sat Aug 18, 2007 1:03 pm

Armenian wrote:
Immortal Persian wrote:It can be put to good effect on the battlefield. Our Air Force uses swarm attacks.These are ground attack aircraft and trainers. These can be used to fly in low below radars. Very easy maintenance and can land in small airfields in Iran re-arm and re-fuel in 10 minutes take off again and continue air attacks.


Thank you for the information. I more or less agree with you, in hands of competent individuals the aircraft in question can have a positive impact on a battlefield. However, knowing the complexity of modern warfare, and the military technology deployed by Globalist/Zionist forces in the region, I don't see the aircraft as being a serious threat to US forces.


Your most welcome.

Zionist forces got crushed by a militia of 10,000 Arabs led by Iranian commanders.It may not be a serious threat but it is part of a bigger military plan.If hundreds of these use swarm tactics flying low under radars.Against naval forces they can be a very real threat or in low level air to ground support.
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Postby Armenian on Sat Aug 18, 2007 4:43 pm

Immortal Persian wrote:Zionist forces got crushed by a militia of 10,000 Arabs led by Iranian commanders.It may not be a serious threat but it is part of a bigger military plan.If hundreds of these use swarm tactics flying low under radars.Against naval forces they can be a very real threat or in low level air to ground support.


What Iranian lead Arab force are you referring to?

Regarding the aircraft, I agree. If used properly it can have an effect on the battle field. What's more, US sea and ground forces in and around the Persian Gulf are very vulnerable to such types of attacks. However, this is all contingent upon how well Iranian military personal are trained and motivated. Nevertheless, I have much more hope in Iranians than I do in Arabs.

I hope it never comes to a war, but if it does I have no doubt that Iran with Russian and Chinese backing will come out on top.
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Postby Immortal Persian on Sun Aug 19, 2007 5:11 am

Armenian wrote:
Immortal Persian wrote:Zionist forces got crushed by a militia of 10,000 Arabs led by Iranian commanders.It may not be a serious threat but it is part of a bigger military plan.If hundreds of these use swarm tactics flying low under radars.Against naval forces they can be a very real threat or in low level air to ground support.


What Iranian lead Arab force are you referring to?

Regarding the aircraft, I agree. If used properly it can have an effect on the battle field. What's more, US sea and ground forces in and around the Persian Gulf are very vulnerable to such types of attacks. However, this is all contingent upon how well Iranian military personal are trained and motivated. Nevertheless, I have much more hope in Iranians than I do in Arabs.

I hope it never comes to a war, but if it does I have no doubt that Iran with Russian and Chinese backing will come out on top.


IRGC commanders in Lebanon.How do you think Hezbollah was formed and so forfth.

Only a fool wishes for war.But if it comes Iranians will fight till the last drop of blood.
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Postby Armenian on Sun Aug 19, 2007 7:47 am

Immortal Persian wrote:IRGC commanders in Lebanon.How do you think Hezbollah was formed and so forfth. Only a fool wishes for war.But if it comes Iranians will fight till the last drop of blood.


Correct. I should of guessed it myself, my mind was simply in and around the Persian Gulf region. Hizbollah is the only entity in Lebanon worth of respect. I'm glad to say that their relationship with the Armenian community in Lebanon is exemplary. And the last elections there were also good news for Hizbollah.

Some questions for you. if you don't mind:

Are you an Islamist or an Iranian nationalist, or a combination of both?

How do you feel about your compatriots in the US who are participating in anti-Iranian propaganda? Of course, many of the "Iranians" in the US are Jews. And naturally, there are many "Shahists" in the US as well.

What are your thoughts about Azeris of Iran and what are your thoughts about Azeris of Azerbaijan? I know that there is an effort by Turks and Americans to manipulate the nationalistic sentiments of the Azeri population in Iran.
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Postby Immortal Persian on Tue Aug 21, 2007 8:07 pm

Not at all.Sorry I did not see this before.

Are you an Islamist or an Iranian nationalist, or a combination of both?


Islam is not Persian or native to Iran,It is a Arab religion only fit for Arabs not any Iranian.I'm a Iranian Nationalist first.

How do you feel about your compatriots in the US who are participating in anti-Iranian propaganda? Of course, many of the "Iranians" in the US are Jews. And naturally, there are many "Shahists" in the US as well.


Propaganda about Iran has been going on for 30 or more years.Really nothing has changed.Most of them are Jews so they do not have loyalty.The Monarchists are to busy partying and what not to think of any thing.

What are your thoughts about Azeris of Iran and what are your thoughts about Azeris of Azerbaijan? I know that there is an effort by Turks and Americans to manipulate the nationalistic sentiments of the Azeri population in Iran.


Turkic trash that are Pan-Turks.The Azeri's in Azerbaijan should leave Armenian land alone and stay out of any conflict with Armenian's.Iran provide aid to Armenia during the last war because of the Turkic land blockade.The Azeri's are a large ethnic group in Iran.The loyalties of them are questionable.In 1979 they started the Revolution and took to the streets.They are very easy to manipulate.
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Postby Armanen on Wed Aug 22, 2007 7:41 pm

Is Iran nearing closer to azerbaijan, and if so, how will this affect Armeno-Persian relations?


GIRAGOSIAN: IRAN'S RELATIONS WITH AZERBAIJAN MORE IMPORTANT

Panorama.am
20:53 21/08/2007

"It is symbolic that right now the president of Iran is visiting
Azerbaijan, while their vice-president is in Yerevan," stated Richard
Giragosian, head of the Washington bureau of Caucasian and Central
Asian issues, while meeting with journalists at the "Friday" club. He
added that while the Iranian president is in Baku discussing energy
and transit issues, the vice-president is in Yerevan talking about
sports, meaning, in his opinion, that Armenia remains isolated from
advancements in the region.

To the question of if it is possible to conclude from all this
that Iran-Azerbaijan relations are more important , he said that
Armenia-Iran relations are in general more secure and stable than
Iran-Azerbaijan relations, but that "The recent Iranian visit to Baku
means that Armenia is placing more importance on relations with Russia,
considering it dangerous to deepen relations with Iran."

According to Giragosian, Azerbaijan is more important to Iran than
Armenia, from the point of view that the Iranians have more areas
to work together with Azerbaijan concerning the benefits they can
receive from the region's energy networks.



IRAN SUPPORTS AZERBAIJAN'S POSITION ON ARMENIAN-AZERBAIJANI NAGORNO-KARABAKH CONFLICT: PRESIDENT OF AZERBAIJAN

Trend News Agency
Aug 21 2007
Azerbaijan

Azerbaijan, Baku /corr. Trend A.Ismaylova / Iran supports position
of Azerbaijan on the Armenian-Azerbaijani Nagorno-Karabakh conflict,
said the President of Azerbaijan, Ilham Aliyev, on 21 August in Baku
at the press-conference as a result of talks with the President of
Iran, Mahmoud Ahmadinejad.

He said that an article on the Nagorno-Karabakh conflict was included
in the joint declaration of the Presidents which was signed on 21
August in Baku. The State Head of Azerbaijan said that he discussed
with Mahmoud Ahmadinejad the joint projects, as well as measures to
ensure stability in the region. Aliyev added that the results of the
talks showed that the two countries are near each other. Touching upon
the regional conflicts, Mahmoud Ahmadinejad said that all problems
should be resolved via talks.

"Those who create conflicts and apply force for regulating conflicts
do not hold the position of peace and justice," Ahmadinejad said.

According to him, Iran supports peace, stability and respect for the
rights of all peoples. He said that all peoples have equal rights.

"Iran is against any violence worldwide. The peoples should resolve
conflicts peacefully," Iranian President highlighted.

The conflict between the two countries of South Caucasus began in 1988
due to territorial claims by Armenia against Azerbaijan. Armenia has
occupied 20% of the Azerbaijani land including the Nagorno-Karabakh
region and its seven surrounding Districts. Since 1992, these
territories have been under the occupation of the Armenian Forces. In
1994, Azerbaijan and Armenia signed a ceasefire agreement at which time
the active hostilities ended. The Co-chairs of the OSCE Minsk Group
(Russia, France and USA) are currently holding peaceful negotiations.




IRAN, AZERBAIJAN SET TO BOOST ENERGY TIES

Trend news agency
21 Aug 07
Baku

21 August, Baku: There are projects between Azerbaijan and Iran
on joint entry into the world market, which will promote regional
security, Azerbaijani President Ilham Aliyev said at a news conference
on the results of his talks with Iranian President Mahmud Ahmadinezhad
in Baku on Tuesday [21 August].

Both Azerbaijan and Iran may be involved in the Nabucco project in
the future, which is expected to increase gas export to Europe. The
capacity of the pipeline will exceed 20bn cu.m. of gas annually.

Speaking about the current energy operations, the Azerbaijani president
said that due to Armenia's blockade, the second stage had started
in the project of delivering Iranian gas to the Naxcivan Autonomous
Republic.

"Being neighbouring countries, Azerbaijan and Iran should support
each other," Aliyev said.

Azerbaijan and Iran are not making full use of their existing economic
potential, he said. Trade between the countries in 2007 has increased
by 60-70 per cent, and the sides intend to boost it further.
It's a custom of the human condition for the masses to remain ignorant. It's what they do. In fact, that IS how "the peace" is kept. Whatever democracy we have here is a spectator's sport.
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Postby Armanen on Tue Aug 28, 2007 6:45 am

Islamic Republic of Fear

Aug 23rd 2007
From The Economist print edition


Restoring the revolution, taking away civil liberties


THE head of Iran's judiciary is a confident man. Despite foreign attempts at slander, Ayatollah Mahmud Hashemi Shahrudi recently declared, his country has presented a fine image to the world of Islamic law at work.

If news were limited to such mercies as the recent release, on bail, of Haleh Esfandiari, a 67-year-old Iranian-American academic, after six months in jail on charges of espionage, or the amnesty granted to 4,000 other prisoners on the occasion of the birthday on August 20th of Imam Hussein, a revered Shia martyr, Mr Shahrudi's confidence might be justified. But these welcome developments come against a darkening backdrop, as the administration of President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad intensifies a campaign to reimpose the moral fervour, and xenophobic zeal, of the 1979 Islamic revolution's early years.

The rest of the world may be more concerned about Iran's nuclear ambitions. But for many Iranians, the issue that has begun to outweigh other troubles, such as poverty, unemployment and the danger of war with America, is human rights.


This is not surprising. Recent months have seen the largest crackdown on civil liberties since the 1980s. Purges of suspected liberals have decimated university faculties, and repeated closures have all but silenced the once-vociferous opposition press. Ms Esfandiari was the best-known of four Iranian-American scholars incarcerated earlier this year for alleged ties to American intelligence. Her colleagues remain in prison. But since the spring a wave of arrests has targeted everyone from women's-rights advocates to student leaders, trade unionists and critical journalists, packing the country's prisons so tight that police are commandeering other buildings as makeshift lock-ups.

Political activists are not the only ones at risk. Security officials boast that their campaign against “bad hijab”, which includes the warning, booking or detaining of women deemed insufficiently clad, but extends also to youths sporting “Western-style” haircuts, rock-music fans, shopkeepers selling indecent garments, and unmarried couples, has alone netted more than 500,000 offenders since April. And unlike previous dress-code enforcements, which tended to relax after a few weeks, this one appears to be growing stricter. Signs have appeared outside public hospitals declaring that only women wearing the head-to-floor chador, and not merely the headscarf, will be helped.

As much as the scale of the crackdown, its severity is raising eyebrows. Much of the police action has been accompanied by complaints of brutality, and in many cases by documentary evidence such as graphic footage of beatings, posted on dissident websites. Despite prison crowding, punitive use of solitary confinement appears to have grown more common. The number of executions nearly doubled last year, to 177, bringing Iran the unsavoury distinction of being the world's heaviest user of capital punishment per head of population. This year has seen not only a further jump in the number of judicial killings but a return of mass public hangings, which are sometimes broadcast on state television.

Such harsher treatment, say rights activists, is partly a product of the paranoid atmosphere generated by a government that has deliberately associated any form of civil disobedience with alleged foreign plots. Recent remarks by the country's chief of police made this link explicit. Once they had dealt with “propagators of moral decay”, he said, his forces would turn their attention to those who “theorise on corruption”, such as critics whom he tied to foreign conspiracies aimed at a “soft overthrow” of the Islamic Republic.



The dissent within
But foreign spies and decadent liberals are not the regime's only critics. Mr Shahrudi, the chief judge, has himself voiced dismay over the government's policies. In July he condemned the stoning to death of a man accused of adultery, and sponsored this month's mass amnesty in what was seen as a sign of discomfort with police excess. He has also joined a broad range of former officials, economists, oil executives and businessmen in attacking Mr Ahmadinejad's erratically autocratic economic policies, which have included forcing banks to slash interest rates, splurging on costly infrastructure projects and replacing respected technocrats with cronies.

Many establishment figures agree that, rather than American bluster, it is these policies that endanger the country. To paraphrase Mr Shahrudi in a recent interview, if Iran wishes its revolution to be a model, a good start would be to get its economy in order. Another way might be to treat its people better.




Too energetic a friendship

Aug 23rd 2007 | ANKARA
From The Economist print edition


An attempt to bypass Russia annoys the United States

COCKING a snook at America seems an odd way to launch a second term in office for a government eager to prove its pro-Western credentials. Yet that is what Turkey's mildly Islamist Justice and Development party (AK) appears to be doing, just weeks after its landslide victory in the July 22nd parliamentary election.

Turkey's prime minister, Recep Tayyip Erdogan, dispatched his energy minister, Hilmi Guler, to Iran last week where he concluded a raft of deals. They include the establishment of a joint company to carry up to 35 billion cubic metres of Iranian natural gas via Turkey to Europe, and the construction of three thermal power plants by Turkish companies in Iran.

America swiftly complained. “If you ask our opinion, do we think it's the right moment to be making investments in the Iranian oil and gas sector, no we don't,” sniffed a State Department spokesman. There were mutterings about possible sanctions. But Turkey insists it has the right to pursue its interests. And Iran is delighted. “Nobody can come between Iran and Turkey,” Iran's president, Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, crowed recently.

Mr Erdogan's critics have seized on his dealings with Iran as proof that he is trying to steer Turkey away from the West. In fact, they have just the opposite aim: to boost Turkey's chances of joining the European Union by making it a vital energy corridor for oil and gas flowing between the energy-rich former Soviet states, the Middle East and Europe.

This is not as far-fetched as it sounds. EU countries import half their energy, with around a fifth of their oil and gas coming from Russia's state monopoly, Gazprom. The need to diversify sources was driven home in 2005 when Gazprom arbitrarily increased the price of gas it supplies to Ukraine by pipeline. Russia's use of its energy riches to flex its muscles on the world stage is one reason why America is lobbying so hard for the creation of an east-west energy corridor—a network of oil and gas pipelines running from former Soviet Central Asia and Azerbaijan via Turkey, and on to European markets.

The first big step towards weakening Russia's grip was the inauguration in 2005 of a multi-billion-dollar pipeline carrying Azerbaijani oil from offshore Caspian fields to the Turkish port of Ceyhan, in the southern Mediterranean. This provocation, from the Russian point of view, was compounded by the launch of a parallel line carrying natural gas from Azerbaijan (and eventually, Turkmenistan and Kazakhstan), which was completed last year. But Gazprom hit back by raising the price of the gas it sells to the Azerbaijanis, who rely on Russia for nearly half their supply.

This, in turn, forced them to use more of their own gas, leaving them unable to fill the Turkish pipeline, which lay idle until last month.

In a further blow, Gazprom announced a venture with Italy's Eni in June to build a line across the Black Sea from Russia to Bulgaria. All this makes it less likely that Turkey will, by 2011, achieve its dream of extending a recently completed pipeline to Greece as far as southern central Europe.

That is why Turkey has turned to Iran, according to Necdet Pamir, a veteran Turkish energy analyst. Iranian gas would not only help to fill the Nabucco pipeline, another mooted conduit from the Middle East or Central Asia, bypassing Russia, but would also reduce Turkey's own dependence on Russian supplies: over half of Turkey's natural-gas demand is met by Gazprom. Unlike the former Soviet producers, Iran controls several shipping lanes and borders Turkey. “The paradox for America is that Iran is the only country other than Iraq that can truly undermine Russia's [energy] supremacy,” observes Mr Pamir.
It's a custom of the human condition for the masses to remain ignorant. It's what they do. In fact, that IS how "the peace" is kept. Whatever democracy we have here is a spectator's sport.
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Postby Armanen on Thu Sep 06, 2007 4:17 am

IRAN TO START GAS EXPORTS TO ARMENIA LATE SEPT.

Mehr News Agency
Sept 4 2007
Iran

TEHRAN, Sept. 4 (MNA) - Iran will launch its gas exports to Armenia
by September 22, said the National Iranian Gas Export Company (NIGEC)
managing director here on Tuesday.

Talking to MNA, Nasrollah Seifi added, "According to the latest
negotiations with Armenia, Iran has completed pipe-laying operations
and Armenia is ready to import gas.

Iranian President Mahmud Ahmadinejad and his Armenian counterpart
Robert Kocharian opened the pipeline's first section at a ceremony
near the border.

Under the first stage of the project, Iran will annually export some
400 million cubic meters of gas, which will be increased up to 3.2
billion cubic meters when the 141km link is completed.

The 100km Iranian section runs from Tabriz to Iran-Armenia border.

The Armenian section runs from Meghri region to Sardarian.

According to preliminary estimates, about $90-100 million was
allocated for construction works in Armenia and Iran earmarked about
$120 million for construction activities on its territory.

Pointing to electricity export, he said that the side's plan is to
increase its capacity for importing power from Iran.

Referring to exports of five million tons of Iran's LNG to India,
he announced that the contract was signed two years ago and now the
Economic Council is not agree with the price, hence, it should revise
the case.
It's a custom of the human condition for the masses to remain ignorant. It's what they do. In fact, that IS how "the peace" is kept. Whatever democracy we have here is a spectator's sport.
Armanen
 
Posts: 179
Joined: Tue Feb 27, 2007 6:13 am
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